The Alamo Sculpture

The Alamo Sculpture "The Cube" Returns to Astor Place

There have been many storied days across the colorful decades of Astor Place's history, November 1, 2016 was one of those days.  

Shortly after 3.30pm Tony Rosenthal's iconic Alamo Sculpture, popularly as "The Cube", gracefully slid down its central support column, and then with a confident "clank" announced its arrival back home.

The Cube has been away from Astor Place for over two years while the redevelopment and reconfiguration of the area has taken place. While away The Cube has been painstakingly restored by Aegis Restauro where it has been taken apart, repainted and strengthened for many more decades of spinning!

The "Alamo" was first installed in 1967 as part of the Department of Cultural Affair's "Sculpture and the Environment" temporary art initiative. It was originally meant to be on display in Astor Place for a short 6-month period, but it was so popular among the neighborhood that the sculpture became a permanent installation. The cube was created by Bernard "Tony" Rosenthal who named it The Alamo after his wife noted that its weight and presence reminded her of the Alamo Mission. 

To say The Cube has obtained cult status among New Yorker's would be an understatement! For many it symbolizes a period of their youth, growing up during a time of significant social and cultural change. For most New Yorker's it is far more than a piece of public art, it is a real tangible part of their lives to which they maintain a deep affinity. Like many thousands of New Yorkers we say the day The Cube returned, November 1, was a very special day.

Visit The Cube soon, spin it, spend time with it, reflect on your personal memories with and remember the hope and happiness that it symbolizes.

Welcome home dear, Cube. 

Click here to watch the moment the Cube touched back down in Astor Place.